• Third Grade Standards

    Reading 
    Key Ideas and Details:
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1
    Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.2
    Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.3
    Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

    Craft and Structure:

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4
    Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.5
    Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.6
    Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

    Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7
    Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.8
    Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.9
    Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

    Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.10
    Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
    Math 

    Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.1
    Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.
    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.2
    Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.
    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3
    Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.1
    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.4
    Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = _ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?

    Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.B.5
    Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.2 Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)
    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.B.6
    Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32 ÷ 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8.

    Multiply and divide within 100.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.C.7
    Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

    Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.D.8
    Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.3
    CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.D.9
    Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.